Skip to content

Free lecture, “Benedictine Military School and Priory: a Modernist Landmark in the Pine Forest of Southside Savannah” Tuesday, April 5, 7PM

March 31, 2011
by

Learn about architectural uniqueness in the south and how the post World War II building boom and the modern architecture movement impacted the Benedictines’ building plans during a FREE historic preservation lecture. The lecture, “Benedictine Military School and Priory: a Modernist Landmark in the Pine Forest of Southside Savannah,” is Tuesday, April 5, 7PM at Benedictine Military School’s (BC) 6502 Seawright Drive campus. Prior to the lecture, the Historic Savannah Foundation is presenting a reception at 6:30PM.

After World War II, numerous building programs throughout the U.S, and an approach to modernist architecture took hold. Benedictine monasteries around the country, including the Benedictine campus and priory in Savannah, experienced their own expansions featuring modernist architecture.

The public is invited to learn more about modernist architecture and the post World War II era as well as the local impact during a free lecture, “Benedictine Military School and Priory: a Modernist Landmark in the Pine Forest of Southside Savannah” Tuesday, April 5, 7PM in the Academic Well at BC’s 6502 Seawright Drive campus. Prior to the lecture, Historic Savannah Foundation (HSF) is presenting a reception at 6:30PM. HSF is co-sponsoring the April 5 lecture.

Robert Ciucevich , M.H.P., is the guest lecturer. He is a 1986 graduate of Benedictine and will provide a tour of the campus after his presentation. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Ciucevich received his Master of Historic Preservation Degree in 1998 from the University of Georgia. His historic preservation consulting business, Quatrefoil Consulting, has completed projects including National Register Nominations and Historic Resources Surveys for several towns and cities throughout Georgia. He has also written a history of Tybee Island, which was published in 2005.

This is the second lecture in the Father Albert C. Bickerstaff, O.S.B. Memorial Lecture Series that is named for the late Father Albert. A beloved member of the BC faculty and Benedictine Priory, Father Albert served as BC’s director of guidance, was a teacher and coached several athletic teams.

BC is a Catholic, Benedictine military school educating a diverse male population in the military tradition. While BC is committed to preparing young men for college, it also fosters life-long learning and service to others. BC is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. For more information about BC visit http://www.thebc400.com.

Historic Savannah Foundation is a non-profit historic preservation organization supported by a strong and dedicated membership. The Foundation was established in 1955 in order to save the 1820 Isaiah Davenport House from demolition. From this initial project, Historic Savannah Foundation launched a Revolving Fund Program, which has saved over 350 buildings. The mission of Historic Savannah Foundation is to preserve and protect Savannah’s heritage through advocacy, education and community involvement.

2 Comments leave one →
  1. April 6, 2011 3:51 am

    A school building was fenced off with barbed wire in Espoo, Finland in 1908 (see the picture in the link). Swedes fenced off school buildings with barbed wire, in order to ban children the access to a school.

    The Swedish government was responsible for the most iron ore the Nazis received. Kiruna-Gällivare ore fields in Northern Sweden were all important to Nazi Germany.

    These massive deliveries of iron ore and military facilities from Sweden to Nazi Germany lengthened World War II. Casualties of the war have been estimated at 20 million killed in Europe. How many of them died due to Sweden’s material support to Nazi Germany, is not known.

    http://www.thoughts.com/raimo/case-sweden

Trackbacks

  1. Free lecture, “Benedictine Military School and Priory: a Modernist Landmark in the Pine Forest of Southside Savannah” Tuesday, April 5, 7PM | Architecture news

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: